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of you in the back -- i will read it for you. bob actually said in an interview, "the united states both economically and mill tarle and also in terms of its overall influence is really is as strong as its ever been." he said this on february 21, 2012. do you agree with the assertion that right now or in 2012 the united states is as strong as it has ever been? >> it depends, david, if you are speaking about strong relative to whom. i think it is true we are still the most emulated in the world. but it is possible to be the world's cleanest dirty shirt. so i sort of america as going back to -- i have to answer this in a little bit of detail. in terms of, one of the things that made us strong to start with, and i would argue, that we actually had a formula for success in this country. one, we educate our people up to and beyond what the technology was, so they can get the most out of it. whether it was universal secondary education, and then it was universal post secondary education. second, we have the world's best infrastructure. roads, railroads, third, we have the world's most immigrat
of the united states is at 47%. now, sometimes folks simply don't vote. certainly number built into participating. but 47%, which the obama people thought was the magic number that would put mitt romney into water, this stage what you mentioned it. is not an entirely happy number for barack obama spent and i'm not saying that the election is over. this is in the zone of uncertainty, where lots of things can happen, 12 years ago when george bush was ahead three to six points, depending on the poll and news of his drunk driving arrest. and just stopped his progress but he didn't lose votes but he gained no votes. and al gore stormed and if i did kerry to win the popular vote. and who knows what the next 12 days are going to bring. but looking at the data carefully, i don't want to discount the possibility that michael is right at all. far from me to do that. i just think there's lots of reasons i think that in ohio, it's looking a little stronger for obama than it is for from the. and that the opportunities to win an electoral victory absence of late 1980 break against the presid
and the new united states. to 19, 1812, james madison made an announcement of the first were to be declared in the history of the united states. "i exhorts all the good people of the united states as they love their country, as they feel wronged that they exert themselves." and made clear the expectation of showing love of country requires giving support to the war. of a moment of national crisis, patriotism was needed. he fell to justify the conflict to motivate the country to support the war. the stakes were high because although a majority had voted in favor of for not one single member of the federalist party voted to support it. the northeastern federalist took a skeptical view more than seven and western members of the democratic republican party. a conflict with britain over national sovereignty, the american war of 1812 became of test of the strength and meeting of american patriotism. we tend to forget the word 1812 between the revolutionary independence movement and trans formative carnage of the civil war. the war between 12 has a dubious distinction the first to be declared in a
in the united states because of the human rights violations alleged in the complaint. they sued the defendants for their role in these human rights violations in u.s. general personal jurisdiction of our courts. abouts nothing unusual suing a tortfeasor in our -- >> may i ask you about the statement you just made? personal jurisdiction was raised as a defense, right? >> personal jurisdiction was raised as an affirmative defense, but not raised in a motion to dismiss. >> and so your position is it was waived? >> yes. >> but it was not adjudicated. is there -- >> it was not adjudicated in this case. our position, it was waived when it was not raised in a rule 12 motion. >> what effects that commenced in the united states or that are closely related to the united states exist between what happened here and what happened in nigeria? >> the only connection between the events in nigeria and the united states is that the plaintiffs are now living in the united states and have asylum because of those events, and the defendants are here. there's no other connection between the events that took place in
, this is "democracy now!" >> in egypt, the united states followed standard operating procedure. standard procedure when one of your favorite dictators gets into trouble. first, the support him as long as possible. but if it becomes really impossible, say the army turns against him, then you send him out to pasture and get the intellectual quest to issue declarations about your love of democracy, then try to restore the bill system as much as possible. >> "who owns the world?" with the presidential election less than two away, we turn to a major new address by noam chomsky on pressing topics not addressed in the president to campaign -- climate change, latin america's break with the united states, the arab spring, and the danger nuclear-weapons already pose in the middle east. >> israel refuses to allow inspections at all, refuses to join the non-proliferation treaty, has hundreds of nuclear weapons, advanced delivery system, and a long record of violence and repression. >> all of that and more coming up. this is "democracy now!,", the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. we are
in a conflict zone, a war zone, in a country where the united states may be very unpopular, people will relate to you as a human being. there will be local cultures of hospitality that take over and effectively protect you. you rely on your fellow human beings to look after you. often, as a foreigner, i am better taken care of by people in many places than if the same people i and interacting with were dealing with locals. >> what was the reaction to you as an american? >> it was ok. people are eager to meet an american, even when they are not happy to meet an american. they are polite. there was an occasion where i went to afghanistan to sit with a man who had been a notorious -- he was accused of being an opium trafficker. there was little doubt. he did not want to talk or see me. but it is afghanistan. i am his guest. he has to offer mitme tea. they spent the whole time complaining about the united states. this was 2002. even though they were very angry, they were going to give mime tea. i was going to walk away and be fine. people respond to you in that way. most people are friendlier than
his guest. he has to offer me tea. they spent the whole time complaining about the united states. this was 2002. even though they were very angry, they were going to give me tea. i was going to walk away and be fine. people respond to you in that way. most people are friendlier than that. most people invite you home and have a lot want to say. it is as if in many cases people had been thinking about the united states a lot. probably a lot more than we think about other countries. even though i am not an employee of the government, i am not an ambassador, it is as if i am the ambassador. they want the united states to know something. what their lives are like. they may have a specific message about a specific american policy, but they are very courteous and often are really energizing to meet. >> you said earlier you are from indiana and you went in to kentucky to college. >> i heard about it through various ways. they are a university that was founded in the coal mining country in eastern kentucky. the daughters who were coal minors had gone there for generations. they wanted mor
talk this afternoon is, love and honor in 1812. patriotism and popular culture in the new united states. on june 19th of 1812, james madison made a public announcement of the first war ever to be declared in the history of the united states. he said, quote, i exhort all the good people of the united states as they love their country, as they feel wrongs, that they exert themselves. madison's call made clear that the expectation of showing love of country required giving support to the war. at a moment of national crisis patriotism was needed. he sought to justify the conflict to the population at large and motivate the country to support the war. the stakes were high because although a majority in congress had voted in favor of declaring war not one single member of the federalist party had voted in support of the war. northeastern federalists took a very skeptical view of the war, far more so than did southern and western members of the democratic republican party that madison was leading. ostensibly a conflict with britain over national sovereignty, the american war of 1812 very quick
of the embassy of the people's republic of china and the united states, based in washington, d.c.. and charlotte schultz, mr. mike rossi, senior adviser on jobs for governor brown. also officials from the delegation. the director-general of the department of foreign investment and administration. mr. wong shi. and mr. -- the commercial counselor of the department of corporation. and the director-general of the investment promotion agency of the ministry of commerce in china. we have more. the chairman of the tschida chamber of commerce -- china chamber of commerce. and from the china contractors association. and the president of the foreign trade and economic relations commission. and the deputy director general, department of commerce of the inner mongolia, autonomous region. the director of economic and trade office of [unintelligible] province. i would like to mention that locally, we have a city council member from fremont, ms. sue chan and supervisor malia cohen is in the house. thank you for coming. i remember not long ago when vice-president -- the vice- president visited the united state
had. france looks a lot more like the united states, frankly. the western hat name in the last decade is also true you do see it. i haven't done this kind of analysis because as data aren't available to me for other countries. but all the normal indicators of how well those economies are performing say that they've been underperforming in much the same way the united states has been underperforming for the last decade, which it can lends credence to the notion that the this is about is globalization and information technology in the ship and the relative value of intangible assets is tangible assets. >> isn't the real point of difference in the health care you are making quick >> there is a big difference in health care. you're right. [inaudible] >> mind this kind of two-pronged two-pronged -- [inaudible] [inaudible] [inaudible] >> well, on the question of women's earnings, yes, the fact that women are the primary caretakers of children in society as compared to their husbands and a lot of women with children don't have husbands, is certainly a factor. and i felt the biggest factor he
's iraq, the first shia arab led state in history is iraq, but we never mention that. the united states cannot come to terms with the fact today that for the first time america and one of america's key regional pillars, egypt, is in place strategically. you doesn't mean they have to become pro-iranian. they are just in play. they're no longer reflective pro-american the iranian military the first time in 30 years can go through the suez. iran doesn't need syria anymore. american elites have a very hard time coming to terms with these facts. and an even harder time coming to terms with the reality that the arab awakening is accelerating erosion of american standing and position in the middle east, not iran's. but rather than face this reality, americans embrace, particularly elites here in washington, embrace the logic defined proposition that the same drivers of political change and powering islamists in arab countries will somehow transform the islamic republic into a secular liberal state. it is a logic defying proposition. still, reality is what it is. on the eve of 9/11, just over 1
or anywhere in the united states and all they need is a computer and an internet connection with an auto dialer company and the auto dialer company then has a connection to carriers and the telephone network or. the auto dialer -- the lead generator is just trying to find people for these products or services for these rachel calls so they are just going to blast out calls. some of these lead generators are calling the phone book and going sequentially through numbers and looking for bodies a lot like e-mail spam because the costs are so much low for now. the startup costs are lower, almost zero as brett mentioned earlier. you can get dialing in a few hours and you don't need a pbx. you don't need lots of copper line and he don't even need a phone. you just need your computer and internet connection, so they will send out these calls going through an auto dialer which will put them into the telephone network and they will go out all over the country. and a very small percentage of people and up answering them in listening to the message and the message will be like one you may have heard
who has a remarkable story about death in iraq and reunion in the united states. >> the i interviewed a guy in the peace, a psychiatrist who used the term moral injury and he said a lot of soldiers and marines stuff from moral injury, which he described as sort of it happens when you get an order, you do something that you believe at the time was absolutely correct and the only thing you could do, and it turns out to have been, to have terrible consequences. that is basically what happened here. >> rose: american foreign policy and a dexter filkins story. when we come back. funding for charlie rose was provided by the following. additional funding provided by these funders. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. rose. >> rose: we begin this evening with the 2012 election last night, president obama and mitt romney balanced it out in the third and final debate. at lynn university in boca raton florida, the suggest was foreign policy but discussion often veered toward domestic concerns as well, the two men addressed a range o
is running for the united states senate. you know very well by plan is my own. i have sought the expert opinions of those outside to get the brightest and the best and every word of that plan has been cited either in the online plan or in print. when you got into this race as the democrats at the thought -- as a democrat and you thought is going to be a coronation and now you are in a serious race with a serious woman. >> we're going to move on to the next question. >> in this tide of rising national debt, i was wondering about congressional earmarked. do you support elimination of them? here is one -- $1.9 million for a water taxi to pleasure beach in bridgeport. >> first call me respond to this last allegation. there is no doubt we'll look at her jobs plan, there are entire paragraphs and sentences lifted from the house republican website, from the cato institute. i don't know what you call it, but all i am saying is this is not a plan rooted in what best for the state of connecticut. this is a plan written by people in washington. when that mcmahon's idea that by simply giving a bunc
what is happening to the promise of the arabs spring and what does this mean for the united states? i certainly think it is important to ask these questions and to seek answers as you are doing today. let me on a personal note start with what happened in benghazi. no one wants to find out exactly what happened more than i do. i have appointed an accountability review board that has already started examining whether our security procedures were appropriate, whether they were properly implemented and what lessons we can and must learn for the future. we are working as thoroughly and expeditiously as possible, knowing that we cannot afford to sacrifice accuracy to speed and of course our government is sparing no effort tracking down the terrorists who perpetrated this attack. and we are focused as we must on what needs to be done to protect our people and our facilities. we had another terrible attack yesterday. i strongly condemn the killing of a long time yemeni employee at our embassy. we are working with yemeni authorities to investigate this and bring those responsible to justice as
here tonight will become president of the united states. the candidates are senator dan quayle and lloyd bentsen, the democratic nominee. [applause] for the next 90 minutes, we will be questioning the candidates following a format designed and agreed to by representatives of the two campaigns. however, there are america rigid restrictions on the questions my colleagues and i may ask. the first question goes to senator quayle. you have to the minister responded. you have been criticized for your decision to stay out of the vietnam war, for your poor economic -- academic record. more troubling by some of the comments to have made in your own party. a separate -- secretary of the state said your peck was the dumbest mistake george bush could have made it. your leader added to the senate said a better qualified person could have been chosen. other republicans have been more critical in private. why do you think you have not made a more substantial impression on some of the people who have been able to observe the up close? >> the question goes to whether yes or qualified to be the
-- that the united states provide. we are per expect we can't see perfect. we have brought enormous amount of public goods. your kids will grow up in a different world. and so that's what i've been to cussed on on than what are the source of our strength and how we new them. you can't renew those sources of strength without some kind of political comprise. now i would argue that we're actually two decisions two big decisions away from a melted up in the american economy. if we get a decision on the grand bargain, the kind of ten year time frame we would manage the cut and spending and tax increases and in investments, we need do all three. we need to tax, cut, and invest in the source of our strength. i think that would have a huge effect. i think americans today feel in many ways like children of two divorced parents. i think it's a pal in the country in a lot of ways. it would be huge. if we got a grand bargain on energy how to exploit the boundary of -- i think the two together would have a huge impact. so the question is how close are we to that? and, you know, i have a saying about the middle e
to accept the right of a sovereign state, a member of the united nations as a viable state, a state which is legitimate, is unacceptable from any point of view. from any aspect and angle whatsoever. we cannot accept the iranians will be allowed to legitimize another state whatever it is. and certainly not from our point of view not israel. they will have swallow two bitter pills not one. one pill will be the pill of the threat nuclear threat and the other will be the threat of accepting israel right to exist. despite the rhetoric we are hearing from teheran, i believe that many iranians in places of power understand that israel is here to stay. they realize that israel not going disappear as it will not disappear. and therefore, they will have to come terms with this reality. and these two elements means to say in order to achieve the aim, you have to find ways of giving them what did i say a few minutes ago? to resort to the use of dignity. it's a different good thing to do. it's very difficult. i'm not saying it's going to be easy. i think it's something we have to do. because we have t
in an interview the united states both economically and militarily and also in terms of its overall influence, really is as strong as it's ever been. he said this on february 21st, 2012 in case you want to pinpoint at least that statement. tom, do you agree with the assertion that right now or in 2012 the united states is as strong as it's ever been? >> that depends, david come if you were speaking about strong, relative in to houma? and in what area. i think there is no question in terms of influence. and on the global stage where the country that is most emulated in the world. but it is possible as mohammed said the world's cleanest dirty shirt also. and so come on a really prefer to think about american strength and i have to answer this question in a little bit of detail in terms of what are the things that have made us strong to start with? and i would argue that we had a formula for success in this country and was built on five pillars. one was educate our people love to and beyond what the technology was so we could get the most out of it. so it was universal primary education, the fac
that i am running for the united states senate. they have said enough spending, enough in debt and enough taxes on the middle-class. we have made changes here in the state of nebraska that grows this economy. that is why i am running for the united states senate. they want a change of leadership in washington. we have a senate in washington that hasn't passed a budget, let alone a balanced budget. we can change that. that is why i am running for the united states senate. i want to pass a balanced budget. i'm not your usual politician. obviously i am not one of the good ole boys, and i will make the tough decisions in the united states senate. we'll roll up my sleeves and work hard for you, and i will fight for you. i will fight for all people. thank you. >> thank you. now the opening statement from former nebraska governor and senator bob kerrey. >> i love nebraska. i was born here in lincoln. i went to lincoln northeast high school. i left nebraska, went to war and came home. i recovered from my injuries here in lincoln. i started a business that today employs more than 700 people. i hav
priority of the united states is to maintain the safety of the united states. i will not cut the military by $1 trillion. which is a combination of the budget cuts the president has as well as the sequestration cuts. in my view, that is making our future less certain at less secure. >> this is not something that i proposed. it is something that congress propose. it will not happen. the budget that we are talking about is not reducing our military spending, it is maintaining it. governor romney has not spent enough time looking at how our military works. you look at the navy for example. we also have fewer horses and bayonets. the nature of our military has changed. we have these things called aircraft carrier's warplanes plan of them. -- where planes land on them. we have shipside go underwater and nuclear submarines. this is not a game of battleship where we are counting ships. it is, what are our capabilities? when i sit down with the secretary of the navy and the joint chiefs of staff, we determine how we will meet our faith with our troops. making sure that the veterans have the kind
gets arrested for his activities. he spends three years in jail before returning to the united states in deciding to dedicate his entire life to saving north koreans. you cannot possibly read this book without being profoundly moved without frankly been moved to tears and just about every single chapter. and the stories are incredible. we will go into greater detail in some of these momentarily. melanie kirkpatrick, i'm jay lefkowitz will introduce shortly uses the best of her journalist sensibilities honed in three decades at "the wall street journal" to highlight the human side of the tragedy of north korea and we are deeply proud and we look forward to her comments today. copies of "escape from north korea" are available for purchase at today's event for $20 melanie curt -- it would be glad to send your copy. it's also available at buy your shallow view another online booksellers to read it, discuss it and read it again. i now have a special pleasure of introducing my friend, jay lefkowitz. shea is a senior partner at kirkland and alice here in new york city. jay is a w
and three other americans and marked the first assassination of a sitting united states ambassador in almost three decades. wendell has the news from the white house. republican complaints involved more than inadequate security at the consulate. >>reporter: they accusing the administration of misleading the public for a week by suggesting the attack grew from a protest against an anti-islam film made in this country. that film triggered protests in other arab countries including in cairo earlier on september 11th. in the debate last night, republican challenger paul ryan suggested the president blamed the film for the embassy attack. in a speech at the united nations, two weeks later, he blamed them. >> he went to the u.n. and said six times talked about the youtube video. look, if we hit by terrorists we will call it for what it is: a terrorist attack. our ambassador in paris has a marine detachment regarding him. shouldn't we have one regarding our ambassador in benghazi? >> there is a marine detachment at embassy in tripoli but not the consulate where ambassador stevens was killed. >>trac
returning to the united states and deciding to dedicate his entire life to saving north korean. cannot possible read the bock without being moved to tears in just about every single chapter. and the stories are incredible they go in to greater detail on some of these momentarily. melanie kirkpatrick, whom jay will introduce her shortly using the best of the journalist sensibility honed at nearly three decades at the "the wall street journal" to highlight the human side of north korea. we are deeply proud of her and we look forward to her comments today. copies of the escape from north korea are available for purchase at the event for $20 and melanie kirkpatrick will be glad to sign your copy. it's available online at i urge all of you to read it and discuss it and tread again. i ?row the special pleasure of introducing my friend jay. he's a senior partner at kirk land and ellis here in new york city. he's a well known commodity in the washington policy world having served with the distinction in two different administration as cabinet secretary under president george h. w.
the united states economy. the price and economic impact would be much greater if these occurred. we hope that this paper which is a departure from the focus of most papers on the consequences of a nuclear iran or a nuclear capable iran will trigger a new discussion and enable an expanded debate on the topic. i would like to introduce michael, the foreign policy director of the bpc, a former oil analyst to boot. he directed this effort and will review some of the key findings. he will introduce our very distinguished panel. mike. >> thank you, senator. thank you everyone for coming. as the senator said, the purpose of this report is really to trigger a debate. we are not suggesting that we have all of the answers, but we wanted to introduce a new dimension to the debate about iran about preventing a nuclear iran. we are not -- focusing on the economics, we are not suggesting the economic issues should drive united states policy one way or another. but it has definitely come up in the debate. it has been raised, certainly in terms of let us say about the impact on sanctions and military, s
, let's begin the long process of making sure we have a system in the united states, a labor intensive system that could employ a large number of dedicated professionals that can support people, support our young people who are not succeeding right now in making that transition from school to work, whether that be from college or high school. third, let's have an energy debate that is the find not by war but by and. there is scope for us to do more with renewals. yes, there is scope for us to do things with fossil fuels that are environmentally better and better in terms of national security because they don't involve dependence on foreign suppliers, of a kind that would have been unimaginable five years ago. and yes, there are still -- there is still substantial scope for increased energy efficiency and energy in efficiency is no less worth pursuing because we have found more natural gas. let's stop debating what the relative priority to attached to these measures are, and let's have our failures in the energy arianna after 50 years of talking, having to do too much rather than tried
in the united states show improvements in september as the presidential campaign heats up in the country. the news could provide a boost to president barack obama. u.s. labor department officials say the u.s. jobless rate dropped to 7.8% in september. the figure is the lowest since obama took office in january 2009. employers added 114,000 nonfarm jobs, matching the expectations of analysts. the nonfarm sector is considered particularly sensitive to economic trends. 44,000 jobs were added in the health care sector. manufacturing employment edged down, shedding 16,000 jobs. >>> policymakers at japan's central bank unanimously decided to maintain current monetary policy. this comes after the rare attendance by the economic and fiscal policy minister. seiji maehara has been advocating aggressive monetary easing to get the economy out of deflation. after the two-day meeting through friday, the policymakers shared the view that personal spending remains steady as the jobs situation is improving. but they agreed that output and exports by manufacturers, one of the main drivers of the japanese
a distinguished career in publish service as a lawyer in arkansas, as a first lady of the united states and more recently as the united states senator from the state of new york. she not only has the highest approval rating of any member of the u.s. cabinet, she has as well topped the gallop poll for 16 years as the most admired woman in the world besting the previous record of eleanor roosevelt who held the title for only 13 years. as america continues to engage in north africa, we are extremely fortunate to be served by a public servant who is engaged in these challenges day in and day out, who cares deeply about the issues and how they effect america's interest and who believes in a brighter future for the people of the middle east. please join me in welcoming the secretary of state, the honorable hillary clinton. [applause] >> thank you. thank you all. thank you very much and a special word of thanks to a friend and someone whom i admire greatly. his many years of distinguished service to our country is a great tribute in every respect. thanks also to john and csis for hosting this conferenc
of the united states or i am without a seat. [laughter] i have no intention of standing. [laughter] >> i must say i have traveled to banquet circuits for years. i never understood the logistics of dinners like this and how the absence of one individual could cause three of us not to have seats. [laughter] >> vice president, i'm glad to see you here tonight. you said you want to give america back to the little guy. [laughter] mr. president, i am that man. [laughter] >> as i looked out at the ties this evening, i realize i have not seen so many people so well-dressed since i went to a come-as-you-are party. >> a lot of good news from yugoslavia, there's one less name for me to remember. [laughter] [applause] >> you know what this world really needs? it really needs more world leaders named al smith. [laughter] >> it is an honor to share the dias with a descendent of al smith. your great grandfather was my favorite kind of governor. [laughter] the kind who ran for president and lost. [laughter] >> all of that al smith program at, and tonight's dinner starting at 9 p.m. e
disappeared from the united states, and we conquered smallpox in the americas in 1971 and worldwide in 1977, sort of lent us confidence that really, there wasn't much that we couldn't do. as a result, the center began to diversify, to broaden its focus. and so we expanded into chronic disease areas. the national institute for occupational safety and health was incorporated into cdc in the early 1970s. much more recently, we've gotten into areas surrounding injury control and prevention. and of course we realized in the last few years that the infectious disease agenda is not over. certainly it's not in the developing world where it still causes a very heavy burden. apart from what aids is doing as probably the most egregious example that we've seen in our lifetimes, having surpassed malaria as the largest killer of people in africa, is tuberculosis, for which we've had good drugs, haven't used them wisely or enough in years past to reduce some of the problems that we're seeing today. and that's getting more and more serious now with multiply resistant strains of tuberculosis. tuberculosis i
, so is mr. mondale's. they saved the life of the president of the united states. i thought that was a cheap shot telling the american people to try to divide class, rich and poor. but the big question, it isn't whether mrs. ferraro is doing well. i think they are depog pretty well. i know barbara and i are doing well. and it is darn sure mr. mondale is doing well with $1.4 million. but the question is, are the tax codes fair? the answer is, the rich are paying 6% more on taxes and the poor are getting a better break. they went to the ethics committee. they went to change the trust. the trust has been revealed. and i was sure glad to see that i had paid 42% of my gross income in taxes. >> are you really a texan? >> i am really a texan. i may have noted she has a new good accountant. i would like to get his name and phone number. i think i paid too much in the way of taxes. and residents, mr. boyd, legal residence for voting is very different. the domicile, they call it, very different than the house. they say you are living in the vice president's house. therefore you don't
. is in the interest of the united states to solve this and get a two-state solution to this? various members of this current administration have said so, and if that's true it would be good to succeed. there are others who are not so sure that it's achievable of that political capital is worth spending on a. that's an important question, important decision for the next administration is the next president wants to do this, he's going to have to build a domestic constituency to overcome opposition. on the question of the iran syria hezbollah act, the administration will have decisions to make about sanctions, about diplomacy, about war. if the iranian regime comes to the table with serious intent, for any reason, either because sanctions are fighting so hard or because they are threats of military strike, or for any other reason, my question as an individual is with the american government take yes for an answer, or will the american government have conditions that are, cannot be met by the other side? and with the administration even consider what was previously called grand bargain, which w
in the united states. but then on wednesday, i saw a thing where bain capital closing down its plant in illinois. ann romney is a reserved shareholder of the bain capital. how is the -- and romney is a reserved shareholder and bain capital. host: let us limit tomorrow humor. this is from last night. instead of a being from the al smith dinner, an appearance by president obama on comedy central's the daily show with john stuart. [video clip] >> how many times a week does he show up in a wet bathing suit to a meeting? >> we had to stop it. we have to put tiles down. but i have to say, he looks pretty good. >host: that is president obama n comedy central with jon storage. he also made comments about libya. we will look at where the candidates stand on foreign policy, foreign affairs and campaign 2012. for now, we are looking at humor. and what role you think plays. does it help or the track to the image you have of him? kentucky, on our line for independents. caller: my comment is but i do not really care for it. i think it just cheapens the issues. they are very serious to people out your sufferin
was because he was never president of the united states. he was never secretary of state. his highest level position in government of the as ambassador to the soviet union and to yugoslavia. he, himself, would have -- [dogs barking] [laughter] he, himself, would have said these were failed ambassadorships, and, so, why a book on the life of george? my answer, and it's only my answer, it would not be universally agreed with, seems it me, is it's good to write a book about someone who saved western civilization, and while it may be something of an exaggeration to say george kennan saved western civilization, if you think it through, there is a case to be made in this regard because all civilization, in fact, was in peril in the half decade or so of the cold war. anyone in washington predigging some 50 years ago when nuclear weapons reefed lethal proportions on both sides, anyone predicting with confidence that we were going to get out of this alive would have had an uphill battle to make that prediction, and surveys that were taken in that age suggested that most americans fully expected to d
went into the united states senate in 2001 with the biggest surpluses in the history of the united states and six years later, left with massive deficits. during his time in the senate, national debt went up by $16,000 every second and in an earlier debate, he conceded spending was a problem when he was in the senate. we also have people who know how to work together. as a nonpartisan mayor in richmond, i worked to cut crime, build schools, and grow the economy, and as a governor in a tough time, we worked to win all kinds of accolades for the state. my opponent, when he was governor, said his job was to knock democrats soft teeth down their whiny throats and took a similar position in the senate, siding against compromise efforts led by then virginia's senior senator john warner. we need to join together to move forward and that's what i'll do as your next united states senator. >> mr. allen, your opening statement. >> thank you, bob, and thank you all for listening and watching this debate. folks, i envision a much better future than what we're having to endure these days and tha
at an advantage and disadvantage to those other countries including the united states, that it is taking advantage of and finding ways around some of the rules and procedures that exist under the world trade organization and we have to use that mechanism but it doesn't deal with all issues. it isn't clear whether it deals with the currency question. it may be difficult to use wto mechanisms to address some of the things the chinese government is doing through the so-called state owned enterprises to give them an advantage and make it more difficult for outsiders to compete for a share of the market. the point i would make overall is we have to find ways to exert leverage, and we have to pursue an integrated strategy that deals with this full range of issues. i guess since i am thinking of it i have a third point that agrees with jeff to the extent it can be a multilateral effort because i think we share important interests with other and dealing on these issues. >> the final and concluding question tonight will be from garrey wong left teach for china sent to us by e-mail and the question is addre
in order for us to invest in the united states and create jobs. >> we've got some good role models even though this roundtable -- business roundtable doesn't get involved and we don't even great legislators. my expense as a governor is a competitive state, our best teachers on political activist with the labor unions, and then later on george soros. he taught every wealthy individual american you can't afford to sit on the sidelines. and so i say go for it. >> we don't do endorsements either. we have a pack. we're very involved, and last week we launch a retail meets the vote campaign and will probably connect wit with a quar of a million retailers and millions of their employees. not endorsing, not to do that would give them voter guide, encouraging them to be in full. if we're going to address any of the issues, maybe we can get something done everything looks exactly the same. but there's a sense of people of a better understanding of our positions there's a greater likelihood we will get some action on them and that's why we've engaged our membership. >> let's go to questions from t
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